The Great Email Debate Topic #2 – Single Opt-In or Double Opt-In

Be sure to vote on the next best practice: single opt-in or double. Every vote counts so tell your colleagues!

2 thoughts on “The Great Email Debate Topic #2 – Single Opt-In or Double Opt-In

  1. I think that Stephanie makes a great point at the end; instead of polling "tastes great" v. "less filling" why not poll to see which methods work best by industry. Publishing is different from retail is different from subscription is different from….

    And there’s something to be said for experience level, too.

    If we were to apply the "Gladwell 10,000 hour rule" as described by Alex Madison and Lisa Harmon (https://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=101416), is the opinion coming from 200, 2,000, or 20,000 hours of experience and from what verticle.

  2. There has been quite a healthy discussion since the Email Evolution Conference of "best," but I believe there is no universal best practice for a email permission standard. Sometimes single opt in is the best practice. Sometimes, double opt in is the best. The only universal answer is that it depends on your business, your brand and your relationship with subscrcibers.

    Certainly, I believe all marketers should gain permission. Yet, many retailers have low complaints and high response using an invisible opt out at checkout. They just add everyone who purchases to the file, and sometimes don’t even mention it except in the fine print. Even a pre-checked box would be a higher standard! And yet, that level of permission seems to work for many retailers.

    Laura Atkins of Word to the Wise points out in her blog that double opt in is also quite familiar to subscribers – many social networks use double opt in and have huge files. Read her post here:
    https://blog.wordtothewise.com/2009/03/the-great-debate/

    I believe the "best practice" when it comes to permission is to not stop at permission. The entire subscriber experience (from content to contact strategy) is what optimizes response, increases engagement and keeps complaints at a minimum. No permission standard will protect you from high complaints and low response if your content is irrelevant or you send too frequently.

    I think a better way to ask this poll question is to let it reflect what permission practice works best for those members who voted. If we saw that data by industry it might actually be more helpful for others to benchmark.

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