HOLIDAY EMAILS: DO YOU KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE?

holiday2014-bf-cmSince many of the retailers this year are already seeing a 11% decrease in sales from Black Friday because sales began much earlier this year, many are now planning on taking Cyber Monday into a Cyber Week. I think retailers and marketers need to be careful with how they are communicating to the end users this week and not over do it and possibly lose them for future opportunities. The #wifeofmyyouth received 300 emails for Black Friday on that day alone and received over 50 emails in the first few hours of Cyber Monday. Even with Black Friday starting earlier this year it sort of ruined my #wifeofmyyouth habit of going out on Friday as an annual event for her, her sister, and her mother because many of the “doorbusters” were gone already. Even more importantly and as she just said to me as I’m writing this, “You isolated me as a consumer when you tell me through your sales that stuff for my family is more important than time with my family when you start sales on Thanksgiving Day. You are saying to me that you should take your Thanksgiving holiday and spend it getting stuff for your family vs. spending it with your family.”

So two things come to mind as result of this thinking. First, think about next year’s sales and how the early shopping didn’t really help your bottom line, and secondly, also make sure you’re asking your customers what sorts of emails do they want vs. IT ALL approach. We want a new fridge, but in many of the emails we’ve seen no big offers for such items. The offers we’ve received are about games, audio, and other easily gained items. What sorts of specific and targeted items can you send me based on the last month of website visits and searches I did with you Mr. Retailer? No one noticed that for the past 6 months we’ve been shopping for that fridge.

Dennis Dayman
eec MAC Vice-Chair
Chief Privacy & Security Officer, Return Path